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The silver screen

Movies and costume designs were an important element in the late period of art deco. After the stock market crash of 1929, people looked to the glamour of the silver screen for hope and an escape from reality. Some of these stars such as Greta Garbo and Mary Pickford were important figures of these times. The picture below is of Mary Pickford with her Oscar. She was one of the first women to win an Oscar for best actress. Below those pictures are some photos of Greta Garbo starring in Matahari. Gilbert Adrian was the designer for many of the pictures, but he is also very well known for the head dresses and extravagant bead work that was featured in Matahari. There is also a poster of the movie ad shown below.

20208241You can see in the above picture, the dropped waist, the scalloped lines of the seams, and the intricate beadwork.

garboOnce again, you can see details of the cloche like hat, but all of the beadwork is very inspired by India and foreign designs.

garbomatahari

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Architecture

The Chrysler building is one of the most well known examples of Art Deco ornamentation in building styles. It was designed my William Van Alan and still inspires designers to this day.

chrysler buildingYou can see some of the art deco inspiration in the details of this picture. The geometric shapes of circles and triangles are used to give this building a unique and bold look in the design.

Below are more examples of art deco architecture. You can find even more here.

art-deco-facadeart decoMuch of the art deco style in architecture can be seen all around the nation, but southern places like Miami are known for much of it. New York also has a lot of art deco inspired buildings still standing today.

The Air Force Academy’s chapel was designed with the inspiration of art deco style in mind. Although the chapel was completed in the sixties, it contains many of the similar design elements as other art deco buildings before its time. The seventeen spires on the chapel are created out of steel and aluminum parts that contain geometric shapes.

chapelchapelchapelThese photos are the compliments of: http://www.american-architecture.info

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These great Art Deco styled rings are authentic and vintage. See more just like them at Fay Cullen.

Art Deco

We’re starting out with the fashion and times of Art Deco. Art Deco was a movement that prevailed from 1925 until the late 1930’s. This art movement was comprised of inspiration from NeoClassicism, Cubism, and Art┬áNouveau. The art deco movement deals a lot with geometric shapes and balance. Much of the art is even influenced from the ancient Greek and Roman times. Artists, fashion designers, and architects took cues from the aqueducts of Rome and the ancient columns that built up the city of Greece.

I’m really fascinated by this time period. It will soon be a one hundred years ago that this style was prevalent, but it’s influences are still so obvious in the designs we see today. Art deco is really a lot about proportions and symmetry as well as this geometric look. It’s evident in architecture, in home decor, and in fashions of course.

Here are some images that show how art deco is still a heavily influencing style today.

Prada ShoesThese Prada shoes have a column like heel on the bottom with very fine detail and are accented with rows of tiny black jewels.

art-deco-wedding-invitationThese wedding invitations from The Knot took a cue from art deco lines in the background of these cards. Triangles, arches, and simple design features were used to create this elegant background.

galleryDrew Barrymore recently gave a nod to the fashions of art deco in this vintage inspired gown at her Grey Gardens aftre party. This photo: Getty Images.

lanvinLanvin used inspiration from Cubism art and Tamara de Lempicka in their fall 2007 ad campaign.

art-decoIn the fall 2008 runway show, Chanel paid high attention to geometric rhinestone details that were reminiscent of the fashions at the time. Photo: Style.com